Our understanding of COVID-19 is evolving.   Although we will endeavor to stay as updated as possible,

the information posted here may not reflect the latest news and practice guidance.












COVID-19

As our community prepares to face a new and novel virus we need to be prepared - not just for the virus but for people's anxieties and fears. 

One of the most important things we can do as providers and advocates is to empower people with information. When we all have the facts it's easier for us to make informed decisions.

We can help address anxieties and fears by:

      • acknowledging that everyone's concerns are valid
      • sharing our own experiences and reactions
      • explaining proven public health responses
      • promoting the evidence 
      • dispelling the myths
      • modelling healthy behaviors

Use the resources listed here to support your efforts. 


  • Por favor, ayúdenos a traducir estos recursos.
  • لطفا در ترجمه این منابع به ما کمک کنید.
  • Alraja' musaeadatana fi tarjamat hadhih almawarid.
  • Kirapā karakē inhāṁ sarōtāṁ dā anuvāda karana vica sāḍī sahā'itā karō.
  • Thov pab peb txhais cov peev txheej no.

  • Hãy giúp chúng tôi dịch các tài nguyên này.

  • 이 자료를 번역하도록 도와주세요.

















The CDC says: Not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19.

Here is some information that might help in making decisions about seeking care or testing.

    • Most people have mild illness and are able to recover at home.
    • There is no treatment specifically approved for this virus.
    • Testing results may be helpful to inform decision-making about who you come in contact with.











Each community and state is setting their own guidelines for testing based on their availability of tests, and guidelines change frequently. For example, testing may be done more frequently in a community until it has been determined that “community spread” is already occurring, at which time testing may be re-prioritized for health care workers and sicker patients. PRIORITY is given to those who have exposure, are showing symptoms, and have additional risk factors.




Have you had contact with anyone with confirmed COVID-19 in the last 14 days?

The incubation period for COVID-19 is about 5 days. * 

Symptoms may appear 2 -14 days after exposure. ** 



* based on data from China, The Incubation Period of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) From Publicly Reported Confirmed Cases: Estimation and Application.


** This is based on what has been seen previously

as the incubation period of MERS-CoV viruses.






Have you had any of these symptoms in the last 14 days?

    • fever greater than 100°F (38°C)
    • difficulty breathing
    • cough


Are you currently experiencing fever over 100°F, difficulty breathing or cough?


Do you have a history of a chronic respiratory condition or current symptoms of a respiratory illness? 

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), bronchitis, asthma, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in infants - especially preterm infants

    • fever + cough
    • fever + shortness of breath
    • blue tint around your lips or fingertips  (This is called cyanosis and means you may not be getting enough oxygen.)
    • labored and unusually rapid breathing
    • confusion and extreme tiredness
    • dizziness or feeling faint  (This could be a sign of low blood pressure.)



Is there a rising number of confirmed COVID-19 cases reported in your social network and community due to significant "community spread?

CDC: Cases in U.S. updated daily








Understand if You Are at Higher Risk

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says that the early information out of China, where COVID-19 first started, shows that some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from this illness. This includes:

    • healthcare workers
    • older adults (over 65)

Those with serious chronic medical conditions like:






Help protect the people who protect us.

Healthcare workers are on the frontline during a pandemic.

That's one of the reasons why it's important not to buy or hoard the supplies that our medical and home healthcare communities need.

It's also a good reason to prioritize their testing and treatment.

If we support social distancing and limit community spread we reduce the risks of having too few healthy providers to care for too many vulnerable patients.


“The risk to our health-care workers is one of the great vulnerabilities of our health care system in an epidemic like this. Most ERs and health-care systems are running at capacity in normal times." 

- Liam Yore, a board member of the American College of Emergency Physicians









The National Perinatal Association and National Association of Neonatal Nurses issue a joint statement. 

Caring for Mothers with COVID-19 and Their Newborn Infants

May 11, 2020




From the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American College of Nurse-Midwives, American Academy of Family Physicians, and Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine

A joint, public statement on the safety of birth in hospitals and birth centers

March 30, 2020


Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN)

AWHONN is committed to supporting nurses during the pandemic with updates on AWHONN’s efforts related to practice, advocacy, meetings, and organizational messages as well as general resources of interest and links to valuable self-care tools.

COVID-19 Practice Guidance

Self-Care Resources



American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)

Coronavirus (COVID-19), Pregnancy, and Breastfeeding: A Message for Patients

Spanish           Simplified Chinese


Coronavirus (COVID-19) and Women’s Health Care: A Message for Patients


Practice Advisory: Novel Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19)

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) is closely monitoring the outbreak of a respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus (COVID-19) that was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China, and continues to expand. Imported cases of COVID-19 infection in travelers have been detected in the United States, and person-to-person spread of COVID-19 also has been seen among close contacts of returned travelers from Wuhan. However, it is critical to note that at this time, for the general public in the United States, the immediate health risk from COVID-19 is considered low.


Novel corona virus disease (COVID‐19) in pregnancy: What clinical recommendations to follow?  PDF 

There appears to be some risk of premature rupture of membranes, preterm delivery, fetal tachycardia and fetal distress when the infection occurs in the third trimester of pregnancy. However, there is no evidence suggesting transplacental transmission based on very limited data, as the analysis of amniotic fluid, cord blood, neonatal throat swab, and breast milk samples available from six of the nine patients were found to be negative for SARS‐COV‐2. Whether virus shedding occurs vaginally is also not known.

Whether COVID‐19 increases the risk of miscarriage and stillbirth is unknown. Concerns have been expressed by experts in the media about women undergoing termination of pregnancy for fear of congenital infection and teratogenicity. However, information on the effect of COVID‐19 on the course and outcome of pregnancy in the first and second trimesters is not available yet.

March 5, 2020


Novel coronavirus infection and pregnancy PDF  

In summary, based on the available clinical and research data, the clinical characteristics of patients with COVID‐19 infection presenting from mid‐trimester onwards are similar to those of non‐pregnant adults. Currently, there is no evidence that pregnant women are more susceptible to COVID‐19 infection and that those with COVID‐19 infection are more prone to developing severe pneumonia. There is also no evidence of vertical mother‐to‐baby transmission of COVID‐19 infection when the maternal infection manifests in the third trimester. Our opinions are in line with the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. COVID‐19 infection should not be the sole indication for delivery; rather, the patient should be duly assessed, and management, timing and mode of delivery should be individualized, dependent mainly on the clinical status of the patient, gestational age and fetal condition. Ongoing collection of clinical data and research is underway with the aim of answering questions in relation to the risk of congenital infection and the optimal intrapartum management, and timing and mode of delivery. Lastly, we would like to pay tribute to all frontline medical professionals who are working tirelessly to bring the COVID‐19 epidemic under control.

March 5, 2020


EXPERT REVIEW: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and Pregnancy: What obstetricians need to know  video  PDF

Sonja A. Rasmussen, MD, MS; John C. Smulian, MD, MPH; John A. Lednicky, PhD; Tony S. Wen, MD; Denise J. Jamieson, MD, MPH

Published: February 24, 2020


Emerging infectious disease outbreaks: Old lessons and new challenges for obstetrician-gynecologists (2006) PDF


Pregnancy and perinatal outcomes of women with severe acute respiratory syndrome (2003)






American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology MFM: Guidance for COVID-19

This document addresses the current COVID-19 pandemic for maternal-fetal medicine (MFM) practitioners. The goals the guidelines put forth here are two fold- first to reduce patient risk through healthcare exposure, understanding that asymptomatic health systems/healthcare providers may become the most common vector for transmission, and second to reduce the public health burden of COVID-19 transmission throughout the general population.

March 19, 2020


Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology (SOAP)

Interim Considerations for Obstetric Anesthesia Care Related to COVID-19




Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Interim Considerations for Infection Prevention and Control of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Inpatient Obstetric Healthcare Settings


Frequently Asked Questions and Answers: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) including:

  • Coronavirus Disease 2019 Basics
  • How it Spreads
  • How to Protect Yourself
  • Symptoms and Testing
  • Information for Healthcare Professionals and Health Departments


Frequently Asked Questions and Answers: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and Pregnancy


WEBINAR: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Update - Information for Clinicians Caring for Children and Pregnant Women


Interim Guidance on Breastfeeding for a Mother Confirmed or Under Investigation For COVID-19


Interim Considerations for Infection Prevention and Control of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Inpatient Obstetric Healthcare Settings


Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): Print Resources




Foundation for Opioid Response Efforts


WEBINAR: Caring for Pregnant and Parenting Women with OUD During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Hendrée Jones, PhD, Professor and Executive Director at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Horizons Program, Maridee Shogren, DNP, CNM, Clinical Associate Professor of Nursing at the University of North Dakota, and Mishka Terplan, MD, MPH, Senior Physician Research Scientist at Friends Research Institute lead a discussion on the unique challenges and concerns for keeping women with OUD safe and in care through pregnancy and the postpartum period in the midst of the COVID-19 national emergency.



MotherToBaby

 Fact Sheet: COVID-19


The MotherToBaby Podcast: COVID-19 in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

Two teratogen information specialists (experts in exposures in pregnancy and breastfeeding) join host Chris Stallman, CGC to address the flood of questions the MotherToBaby service is getting regarding coronavirus exposure in pregnancy and while breastfeeding.




FEATURED ARTICLE:  

Should Infants Be Separated from Mothers with COVID-19? First, Do No Harm

by Alison Stuebe, MD, MSc


      • Separation may not prevent infection.
      • Interruption of skin-to-skin care disrupts newborn physiology.
      • Separation stresses mothers.
      • Separation interferes with provision of maternal milk to the infant, disrupting innate and specific immune protection.
      • Early separation disrupts breastfeeding, and not breastfeeding increases the risk of infant hospitalization for pneumonia.
      • Separate isolation doubles the burden on the health system.
© Alison Stuebe, 2020; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Infographic created under Creative Commons.

FEATURED RESOURCES:

COVID-19 and BREASTFEEDING

SHARED DECISION-MAKING: Determining a Need for Infant Separation


from United States

Lactation Consultants Association (USLCA)



FEATURED PRINTABLES:


FREE Posters


Praeclarus Press, LLC




The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine’s (ABM)

Statement on Coranovirus 2019 (COVID-19)

The choice to breastfeed is the mother’s and families.

If the mother is well and has only been exposed or is a PUI (person under investigation) with mild symptoms, breastfeeding is a very reasonable choice and diminishing the risk of exposing the infant to maternal respiratory secretions with use of a mask, gown and careful handwashing is relatively easy.

If the mother has COVD-19, there may be more worry, but it is still reasonable to choose to breastfeed and provide expressed milk for her infant. Limiting the infant’s exposure via respiratory secretions may require more careful adherence to the recommendations depending on the mother’s illness.




United States Breastfeeding Committee (USBC)

Infant and Young Child Feeding in Emergencies, including COVID-19 *

*updated March 17, 2020


International Lactation Consultant Association's (ILAC)

Statement on Breastfeeding and Lactation Support During the COVID-19 Pandemic

All international world health guidelines agree: Breastfeeding should continue and be supported during the COVID-19 epidemic, with appropriate precautions.

Breastfeeding protects infants and young children, particularly against infectious disease. When a person is lactating and becomes ill with a virus, they develop antibodies to fight the illness. Those antibodies are then conveyed to the infant through breastmilk, helping to protect the infant from illnesses to which the parent has been exposed.



La Leche League International (LLLI)

Continuing to Nurse Your Baby Through Coronavirus (2019-nCoV; COVID-19) and Other Respiratory Infections

The novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) currently in the news is a rapidly evolving global medical situation with limited information available at this time. La Leche League International (LLLI) respects the efforts of international health and medical organizations and associations to maintain up-to-date information and recommendations as understanding of the virus is developed. LLLI will continue to track the development of the current global health crisis. 



United Nations Population Fund

As COVID-19 continues to spread, pregnant and breastfeeding women advised to take precautions

Breastfeeding women who become ill should not be separated from their newborns, the statement adds. There is no evidence that the illness can be transmitted through breastmilk. However, breastfeeding mothers who are infected should wear a mask when near their baby, wash their hands before and after feeding, and disinfect contaminated surfaces. If a mother is too ill to breastfeed, she should be encouraged to express milk for the baby, while taking all necessary precautions.


* Mental health and psychosocial support should be made available

to affected individuals and their families.



Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA)

Milk Banking and COVID-19

The Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA) is closely monitoring the evolving situation regarding the outbreak of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus. As always, HMBANA remains dedicated to providing safe donor human milk to infants in need. Screening criteria for milk donors are rigorous, and designed to protect the incoming milk supply.

For more details, please read HMBANA's full statement on milk banking and COVID-19.






COVID-19: Overview and Evaluation - Pediatric Collection  Open Access

As a trusted pediatric publisher of peer-reviewed research, clinical references, patient education and coding & payment resources, the American Academy of Pediatrics is dedicated to providing AAP members, physicians, and health care providers with the latest open access research and guidance recommendations related to COVID-19. As the world responds to the pandemic, we are committed to fast-tracking COVID-19 research articles and publishing them free to read in this collection. The latest research will pre-publish on pediatrics.org and be deposited to PubMed upon final publication.


American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Tips for Coping with a New Baby During COVID-19


Cloth Face Coverings for Children During COVID-19


AAP's WEBSITE: Healthy Children 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Talking to children about COVID-19

  • There's a lot of news coverage about the outbreak of COVID-19 and it can be overwhelming for parents and frightening to kids. The American Academy of Pediatrics encourages parents and others who work closely with children to filter information and talk about it in a way that their child can understand. These tips can help:
  • Simple reassurance. Remind children that researchers and doctors are learning as much as they can, as quickly as they can, about the virus and are taking steps to keep everyone safe.
  • Give them control. It's also a great time to remind your children of what they can do to help – washing their hands often, coughing into a tissue or their sleeves, and getting enough sleep.
  • Watch for signs of anxiety. Children may not have the words to express their worry, but you may see signs of it. They may get cranky, be more clingy, have trouble sleeping, or seem distracted. Keep the reassurance going and try to stick to your normal routines.
  • Monitor their media. Keep young children away from frightening images they may see on TV, social media, computers, etc. For older children, talk together about what they are hearing on the news and correct any misinformation or rumors you may hear.
  • Be a good role model. COVID-19 doesn't discriminate and neither should we. While COVID-19 started in Wuhan, China, it doesn't mean that having Asian ancestry – or any other ancestry – makes someone more susceptible to the virus or more contagious. Stigma and discrimination hurt everyone by creating fear or anger towards others. When you show empathy and support to those who are ill, your children will too.


COVID-19: Information for Families of Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs


Epidemiology of COVID-19 Among Children in China  Yuanyuan Dong, Xi Mo, Yabin Hu, Xin Qi, Fang Jiang, Zhongyi Jiang, Shilu Tong Pediatrics. Pre-publication release.

March 16, 2020


AAP offers response and updates for members on COVID-19

With news of the first possible instance of community spread of coronavirus has come raised anxiety, myriad questions and a need for guidance from a public health perspective. In response, the American Academy of Pediatrics is reassuring members of the steps they can take now and offering continued support as the outbreak evolves.


COVID-19 and Kawasaki Disease: Novel Virus and Novel Case

We describe the case of a 6-month-old infant admitted and diagnosed with classic Kawasaki disease (KD), who also screened positive for COVID-19 in the setting of fever and minimal respiratory symptoms. The patient was treated per treatment guidelines, with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and high-dose aspirin (ASA), and subsequently defervesced with resolution of her clinical symptoms.

May 8, 2020



COVID-19 and Kawasaki Disease: Novel Virus and Novel Case

We describe the case of a 6-month-old infant admitted and diagnosed with classic Kawasaki disease (KD), who also screened positive for COVID-19 in the setting of fever and minimal respiratory symptoms. The patient was treated per treatment guidelines, with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and high-dose aspirin (ASA), and subsequently defervesced with resolution of her clinical symptoms.

May 8, 2020



Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Frequently Asked Questions and Answers: Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children


WEBINAR: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Update - Information for Clinicians Caring for Children and Pregnant Women


Preparedness measures urged in anticipation of more COVID-19 cases in U.S.: CDC




Atypical presentation of COVID-19 in young infants

Here we describe our experience of COVID-19 in five young infants. In the pandemic context, infants younger than 3 months with isolated fever should be tested for SARS-CoV-2. Although infants might initially present signs of severe infection, our experience is that the youngest children tolerate and rapidly improve from COVID-19, in contrast to adults admitted to hospital with COVID-19. However, because little is known about SARS-CoV-2 infection in infants,4, 6 close monitoring is required for at least 2 weeks after the diagnosis. All of the infants' parents showed mild signs of viral infection (ie, rhinitis, or cough or fever, or both, for <1 week), which could be related to undiagnosed COVID-19.

April 27, 2020








Families First Coronavirus Response Act Medicaid and CHIP Provisions Explained

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act was signed into law (P.L. 116-127) on March 18, 2020. The law is the second piece of legislation enacted by Congress in response to the coronavirus pandemic and negotiations are currently underway on a third, much larger economic stimulus package. The Families First legislation covers a broad range of programs affecting children and families, including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the Women, Infants and Children’s program (WIC), school lunch, family and medical leave, unemployment insurance, emergency paid sick leave, and Medicare. The following explainer brief focuses on the provisions impacting Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).


Enroll for Health Insurance at HealthCare.gov

HealthCare.gov is a health insurance exchange website operated under the United States federal government under the provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which currently serves the residents of the U.S. states which have opted not to create their own state exchanges.

Health coverage if you're pregnant or plan to get pregnant.

Health Care Coverage Options if You're Unemployed


The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP)

If your children need health coverage, they may be eligible for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). CHIP provides low-cost health coverage to children in families that earn too much money to qualify for Medicaid. In some states, CHIP covers pregnant women. Each state offers CHIP coverage, and works closely with its state Medicaid program.



Continuation of Health Care Benefits

You can keep your coverage for as long as 18 months under the federal law known as the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA). But only if you’re willing to pay as much as the total amount of your premium (monthly fee) — both what you normally pay and what your employer had contributed toward your premium.

Though particular circumstances vary, COBRA coverage tends to be more expensive than coverage in the Obamacare marketplaces. It may be a particularly desirable option for anyone in the middle of treatment for an acute or chronic condition because it will allow you to keep seeing the same doctors. Your employer may also be willing to subsidize some of the monthly cost for a period.

- from the New York Times article How to Get Health Insurance if You’re Worried About Coronavirus or Have Lost Your Job: There are more options for getting coverage than in past economic crises   March 25, 2020



Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the largest federal nutrition assistance program. SNAP provides benefits to eligible low-income individuals and families via an Electronic Benefits Transfer card. This card can be used like a debit card to purchase eligible food in authorized retail food stores.  To be eligible for SNAP, most households must meet certain bank balance limits.


Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides federal grants to states for supplemental foods, health care referrals, and nutrition education for low-income pregnant, breastfeeding, and non-breastfeeding postpartum women, and to infants and children up to age five who are found to be at nutritional risk.


The National Diaper Bank Network (NDBN) Directory

NDBN connects and supports the country’s more than 200 community-based diaper banks that collect, store and distribute free diapers to struggling families. The Network serves nearly 280,000 children throughout the country each month.


Helping Women Period    Girls Helping Girls Period   

PERIOD. The Menstrual Movement

The number of families in the USA needing assistance from food pantries continues to increase every year. The lack of access to menstrual health products for people who are either homeless or low-income is appalling. These necessary products are not covered by SNAP or any other welfare program. Each month, this leaves countless people without the products many of us take for granted.


Family and Medical Leave Act

The FMLA entitles eligible employees of covered employers to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same terms and conditions as if the employee had not taken leave.

COVID-19 and the Family and Medical Leave Act Questions and Answers



Legal Rights for Pregnant Workers under Federal Law

If you are pregnant, have been pregnant, or may become pregnant, and if your employer has 15 or more employees, you are protected against pregnancy-based discrimination and harassment at work under federal law. You may also have a legal right to work adjustments that will allow you to do your job without jeopardizing your health. 




Characteristics of Women of Reproductive Age with Laboratory-Confirmed SARS-CoV-2 Infection by Pregnancy Status  United States January 22–June 7, 2020

Summary:

What is already known about this topic?

Limited information is available about SARS-CoV-2 infection in U.S. pregnant women.

What is added by this report?

Hispanic and non-Hispanic black pregnant women appear to be disproportionately affected by SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy. Among reproductive-age women with SARS-CoV-2 infection, pregnancy was associated with hospitalization and increased risk for intensive care unit admission, and receipt of mechanical ventilation, but not with death.

What are the implications for public health practice?

Pregnant women might be at increased risk for severe COVID-19 illness. To reduce severe COVID-19–associated illness, pregnant women should be aware of their potential risk for severe COVID-19 illness. Prevention of COVID-19 should be emphasized for pregnant women and potential barriers to adherence to these measures need to be addressed. 

June 26, 2020



Atypical presentation of COVID-19 in young infants

Here we describe our experience of COVID-19 in five young infants. In the pandemic context, infants younger than 3 months with isolated fever should be tested for SARS-CoV-2. Although infants might initially present signs of severe infection, our experience is that the youngest children tolerate and rapidly improve from COVID-19, in contrast to adults admitted to hospital with COVID-19. However, because little is known about SARS-CoV-2 infection in infants,4, 6 close monitoring is required for at least 2 weeks after the diagnosis. All of the infants' parents showed mild signs of viral infection (ie, rhinitis, or cough or fever, or both, for <1 week), which could be related to undiagnosed COVID-19.

April 27, 2020




Kawasaki Disease From COVID-19 in Kids: How Common? - Warnings out on inflammatory syndrome but many questions remain



COVID-19 and Kawasaki Disease: Novel Virus and Novel Case

We describe the case of a 6-month-old infant admitted and diagnosed with classic Kawasaki disease (KD), who also screened positive for COVID-19 in the setting of fever and minimal respiratory symptoms. The patient was treated per treatment guidelines, with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and high-dose aspirin (ASA), and subsequently defervesced with resolution of her clinical symptoms.

May 8, 2020







Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


Frequently Asked Questions and Answers: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) including:

  • Coronavirus Disease 2019 Basics
  • How it Spreads
  • How to Protect Yourself
  • Symptoms and Testing
  • Information for Healthcare Professionals and Health Departments


Frequently Asked Questions and Answers: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and Pregnancy


Frequently Asked Questions and Answers: Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children


Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): Print Resources


Frequently Asked Questions and Answers: Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children


WEBINAR: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Update - Information for Clinicians Caring for Children and Pregnant Women

Frequently Asked Questions and Answers: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) including:

  • Coronavirus Disease 2019 Basics
  • How it Spreads
  • How to Protect Yourself
  • Symptoms and Testing
  • Information for Healthcare Professionals and Health Departments


Frequently Asked Questions and Answers: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and Pregnancy


Frequently Asked Questions and Answers: Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children


WEBINAR: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Update - Information for Clinicians Caring for Children and Pregnant Women


Interim Guidance on Breastfeeding for a Mother Confirmed or Under Investigation For COVID-19


Interim Considerations for Infection Prevention and Control of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Inpatient Obstetric Healthcare Settings


Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): Print Resources


World Health Organization (WHO)


Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) advice for the public: Myth busters


Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak

On this website you can find information and guidance from WHO regarding the current outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) that was first reported from Wuhan, China, on 31 December 2019. Please visit this page for daily updates.


VIDEO: Coronavirus Update with Anthony Fauci, MD  March 2020


VIDEOS: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) advice for the public  When and how to use masks


DATA:  Report of the WHO-China Joint Mission on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

(page 32)  As opposed to Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, pregnant women do not appear to be at higher risk of severe disease. In an investigation of 147 pregnant women (64 confirmed, 82 suspected and 1 asymptomatic), 8% had severe disease and 1% were critical.

...
Severity (page 38)
Continue to share information on patient management, disease progression and factors leading to severe disease and favorable outcomes
Review and analyze the possible factors associated with the disease severity, which may include:
  • natural history studies to better understand disease progression in mild, severe and fatal patients
  • medical chart reviews about disease severity among vulnerable groups, (e.g. those with underlying conditions, older age groups, pregnant women and children) to develop appropriate standards of care
  • evaluation of factors leading to favorable outcomes (e.g. early identification and care)








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